Earlier this year railway adventurers Vicki Pipe and Geoff Marshall set out to visit all 2,563 railway stations in Great Britain, completing the ambitious journey in 14 weeks, six days, eight hours and 22 minutes.

From Penzance on May 7 to Wick on August 19, the pair filmed a documentary on what Britain’s railways look like in 2017, as an aged system transports more passengers than ever before.

We asked Vicki and Geoff to summarise their mammoth trip in 14 pictures, and this is how they did it:

Credit: All The Stations.

Credit: All The Stations.

1.  Railways and railway stations have featured in music, film and TV for decades. At Cromford station we recreated the single cover of Oasis’s ‘Some Might Say’.

Credit: All The Stations.

Credit: All The Stations.

2. Yes, Britain’s railways can be cute! Like the wonderful Parry People Mover which operates between Stourbridge Town and Stourbridge Junction. Definitely the cutest train we’ve ever seen!

Credit: All The Stations.

The words “love thy neighbour” feature in various languages on the mural. Credit: All The Stations.

3. Art. It’s not just about the trains. Lots of stations and station staff work together with their local community. At Smethick Rolfe Street they recently unveiled a new mural created by young local artists, reflecting the vibrant and diverse cultures of the area.

Credit: All The Stations.

Credit: All The Stations.

4. The history and heritage of Britain’s railways are evident almost everywhere. In Bridlington we were in awe of their amazing refreshment room full of incredible railway ephemera, it was like stepping back in time.

Credit: All The Stations.

Credit: All The Stations.

5. Britain’s railway signs reflect the incredible diversity of languages spoken across the country, from Punjabi in Southall (West London), Arabic in Oxfordshire (Bicester Village) to Welsh (all stations in Wales) and Gaelic (all stations in Scotland).

Credit: All The Stations.

A ladybird climbing a railway bridge at Streatham South Junction. Credit: All The Stations.

6. It’s not just humans that want to catch a train. In all corners of the country animals and the railways live side by side.

Credit: All The Stations.

Photo taken at Dorridge station. Credit: All The Stations.

7. Travelling on the railways is not always about moving, there are lots of spaces to pause and waiting rooms can offer that perfect moment of reflection.

Credit: Roger Newark.

Photo taken at Shippea Hill, Britain’s least used station. Credit: Roger Newark.

8. There are currently 147 request stops in Britain. If you’ve never flagged down a train we highly recommend finding your nearest request stop to have a go, it’s lots of fun, especially if the driver toots the horn in recognition!

Credit: All The Stations.

Credit: All The Stations.

9. Don’t forget to look up, or step outside at stations to enjoy the amazing architecture of the buildings. Often features are not simply decorative but actually help with wayfinding, like the incredible curved structure of Wemyss Bay.

Credit: All The Stations.

Credit: All The Stations.

10. The type of train you travel on can really change your experience of the journey. On the Isle of Wight we were excited to discover that original 1938 London Underground Tube trains serve the national rail network between Ryde Pier Head to Shanklin.

Credit: All The Stations.

A view from the Kyle of Lochalsh line, Scotland. Credit: All The Stations.

11. There is no better way to see the changing landscape of Britain than by train. From rolling hills to dramatic coast lines you can see it all.

Credit: All The Stations.

Credit: All The Stations.

12. We discovered there are almost as many castles in Britain as railway stations! Many of them are not that far from the railway, like Harlech Castle in Wales, which looks impressively over the nearby Harlech station.

Credit: All The Stations.

Credit: All The Stations.

13. Each train operating company has its own distinct livery, staff uniforms and moquette (seating fabric) which helps to identify the services you’re travelling on. Throughout our journey we collected them all, though we do confess London Midland was our favourite.

Credit: All The Stations.

Credit: All The Stations.

14. Railways can take you to some of the most remote places in the country. At Berney Arms in Norfolk the railway is the only method of transport available to reach the same location.

To find out more about the All The Stations project, visit their website by clicking here or re-cap the journey on YouTube